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Hamfat Asar

The creator’s Wikipedia page.

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A Scrap-Book for Homely Women Only

Harper’s Weekly – Mar 22, 1884

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Follies of the Madmen #477

Our cigarettes are enjoyed by problematical outcasts and outsiders.

Source of ad.

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Buried at the golf course

In 1989, a Canadian company tried to promote the idea of burying people at golf courses. They imagined that courses could add memorial walls made out of their patented “mod-urns” — hollow, cremain-filled building blocks that could be snapped together to make instant memorial walls.

A company rep argued that this could be “a potentially lucrative business for golf courses, who could pack in up to 50,000 new ‘members’ per acre.”

Ottawa Citizen – Sep 29, 1989

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Jigsaw Puzzles with Whimsy Pieces

In this pandemic era, jigsaw puzzles have seen increased popularity. But I was unaware of the tradition of “whimsy” pieces, components that exhibit naturalistic shapes. I encountered the notion in an old issue of LIFE magazine.

Then I found out there are modern makers. Here are a couple.

Maker.


Maker.

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Tuberosity Meter

In 1960, Thomas Scoville received a patent for a device for measuring tuberosity. He explained that the purpose of measuring tuberosity was to improve the fit of chairs:

the chief object of the present invention is to provide a novel apparatus which will provide a visual and instantaneous indication when a chair under test is properly dimensioned to fit any given person.

Even after looking up the meaning of the word ‘tuberosity’ in the dictionary, it took me a while to figure out what exactly Scoville’s device was measuring, and what it possibly had to do with chairs. Because the dictionary simply defined tuberosity as a ’rounded swelling.’ Some more googling revealed that Scoville must have been referring to the Ischial tuberosity, or ‘sitting bone’. As defined by wikipedia, this is:

a large swelling posteriorly on the superior ramus of the ischium. It marks the lateral boundary of the pelvic outlet. When sitting, the weight is frequently placed upon the ischial tuberosity. The gluteus maximus provides cover in the upright posture, but leaves it free in the seated position. The distance between a cyclist’s ischial tuberosities is one of the factors in the choice of a bicycle saddle.

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Welcome Home!

More photos at this page.

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Keyboard Jeans

A product concept from Dutch design company Nieuwe Heren. The wireless, flexible keyboard sewn into the jeans was fully functional. However, the jeans could not be machine washed.

As far as I know, these remained a concept and never made it to market. But the company said that, if they were ever to sell these jeans, they’d price them at around £250 ($325).



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Las Pozas

When travel resumes, here’s a destination alluring to any WU-vie.

Read more on the creator here.

His Wikipedia entry.

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Lunar Striptease

Edited to stop short of bare bosoms.

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The postman who pretended to be paraplegic

Ian Moor had qualified to compete in the 1979 National Paraplegic Championships, in events such as table tennis and wheelchair discus. But when a picture of him ran in the Yorkshire Evening Press, people recognized him as their postman, who was fully capable of walking.

His deception revealed, Moor was kicked out of the Paraplegic Championships. But he never faced any criminal charges because he hadn’t benefitted financially from his deception in any way.

The Guardian – Aug 23, 1979

Los Angeles Times – Aug 23, 1979

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Clint Bolin, Rock Collector

Clint Bolin collected rocks. That, in itself, isn’t weird. However, Bolin made it weird by hoarding massive amounts of rocks of absolutely no value. He also collected chunks of concrete and slabs of cement.

When he vacated his Long Beach apartment in 1975, he left behind 60,000 pounds of rocks, all neatly boxed. There were about 600 rock boxes, each weighing over 100 lbs.

Strangely, no one had ever seen him carrying any of these boxes in. And he was only a frail man, weighing about 150 lbs. Plus, he had only lived in the apartment for four months. So how he managed to accumulate so many boxes of rocks in his apartment remains a mystery.

I haven’t been able to find any sources that describe what became of him after he made headlines in 1975. It’s as if he disappeared into thin air.

Los Angeles Times – May 8, 1975



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Peter the Hermit of Hollywood

Article source.

More anecdotal articles here.

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Safety Kisses

Throughout the 20th century, it seemed to be widely assumed that the mood of the husband was determined by the behavior of his wife at home. So, concluded the District of Columbia’s traffic safety office in 1963, if a man was in a ‘disgruntled disposition’ and consequently got into a traffic accident, it must have been the fault of his wife who didn’t cheer him up adequately when he left home with a goodbye kiss “as though she meant it.”

See also: Whose fault is it when your husband is cross at breakfast?

Minneapolis Star – Nov 12, 1963

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Daily Beast News

The Bizarre History of Pandemic Cocktail Cures Life Behind Bars Podcast

What happens when two committed bar flies can’t go to a bar? 

Find out on this episode of the award-winning podcast Life Behind Bars. While sheltering in place at their respective homes, co-hosts David Wondrich and Noah Rothbaum discuss the history of drinking during plagues and some of the cocktail cures that were created and popularized. (Spoiler alert: Rock and Rye doesn’t actually protect you from tuberculosis.) 

So fix yourself a drink and listen to this episode of Life Behind Bars. Cheers!

Life Behind Bars features Half Full’s editor Noah Rothbaum and its Senior Drinks Columnist David Wondrich as they discuss the greatest bartenders and greatest cocktails of all time. It won the 2018 Tales of the Cocktail Spirited Award for the world’s best drinks podcast.

Edited by Alex Skjong

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News RT

MSNBC and Fox News finally agree! Media comments on Trump ‘taking’ malaria drug against Covid-19 reach new level of bizarre — RT USA News

MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough has recommended listening to Fox’s Neil Cavuto over hydroxychloroquine – an anti-malarial drug with hotly-debated effectiveness in fighting Covid-19 – slamming the president’s support for the medicine.

The media went into a frenzy after Donald Trump said he was taking hydroxychloroquine as a preventive measure against coronavirus, but none of the responses have been more bizarre than the apparent teaming-up of liberal commentator Scarborough and Fox News’ Cavuto.

“I say this to seniors who I’m so worried about, and I know we’re all worried about you, because the president’s been acting so reckless over the past several months,” Scarborough said on Tuesday after assuring viewers he does not believe the president is actually taking the drug. “Listen to Neil Cavuto. It will kill you. This will kill you, Fox News’ Neil Cavuto said. That’s what doctors will say, too. The FDA said, take it if you’re in the hospital or take it if you’re in a closely watched, clinical trial. Don’t take it unless you’re under those two circumstances.”




Also on rt.com
‘THIS WILL KILL YOU’: Media goes into anti-HCQ panic mode after Trump says he’s taking the drug to fend off Covid-19



Cavuto had previously blasted Trump for propping up the supposed anti-Covid-19 drug, assuring viewers that “it will kill you.”

The president responded to Cavuto’s attack on Monday night by saying Fox News “is not the same” without the “great Roger Ailes.” The late Ailes was the chairman and CEO of Fox News, a position from which he resigned in 2016 after being accused of sexual harassment by over 20 women.

Trump also went after Scarborough following his Cavuto comments, dubbing MSNBC “MSDNC” and blasting the ‘Morning Joe’ host as a “psycho.” He also, oddly, compared the ratings of ‘Fox & Friends’ – which airs on the “not the same” Fox News – to ‘Morning Joe,’ which typically pulls in far fewer viewers.

Trump’s hydroxychloroquine has set off a bevy of attacks from outraged critics, who have argued the drug should not be taken seriously until it is approved by the FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) to specifically treat Covid-19. The FDA has warned the antimalarial drug can actually cause heart issues for coronavirus patients, but the president has claimed he’s taking it under the supervision of a physician and he’s “ok” so far. 

Despite disagreement about the effects of the drug, it was granted an Emergency Use Authorization to allow hospitals to provide it as an option to patients.

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Mystery Gadget 84

What does this machine do? Hint: it looks enormously overdesigned for its simple function.

The answer is here.

Or after the jump.

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“I have a trunkful of money to deposit”

Charlie Becker, midget trainer with Singer’s Midgets, walked the smallest elephant of his troupe to Merchant’s Bank, and made a deposit for Keith’s Theatre. The elephant delivered the money satchel directly to the receiving teller

Source.

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Trapped 5 days in folding bed

Unfortunately, I can’t find any info about how Leon Colby fared after his 5-day ordeal trapped in a folding bed.

The situation seems like an absurdist, real-life variation on the premise of Stephen King’s Gerald’s Game.

Lancaster Intelligencer Journal – Oct 10, 1977

Some googling reveals that, while being trapped in a folding bed may sound bizarre, it’s disturbingly common. See here, here, and here.

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Perfume-O-Books

In 1960, Monarch Books announced the launch of Perfume-o-Books. These were books infused with perfume.

They had plans to use a saddle-leather scent for westerns, floral odors for flower-arrangement books, and food scents for cookbooks.

All of which seemed logical. However, they decided to launch the line with three movie tie-in titles: “The Enemy General,” by Dan Pepper, “The Stranglers of Bombay,” by Stuart James, and “The Brides of Dracula,” by Dean Owen. These three titles were each infused with a “Chanel 5 type perfume.”

They seem like very odd titles to have been perfumed. And evidently the perfume didn’t appreciably help sales, because no more perfume-o-book titles were ever printed.

Richmond Times Dispatch – Apr 17, 1960

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Citrus & Vegetable Magazine

I cannot find an issue of C&V later than 2014, and the website you see on the cover below seems down. But certainly, if they still exist, they will find it hard to beat the cover for the April 1977 issue.



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Your Biological Safety Mask

Your Biological Safety Mask

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Frederick Newbery’s long-distance milk pipes

Frederick Newbery envisioned pipes transporting milk underground from farms directly into cities. He received a patent for this idea in 1874 (No. 148,620). Though as far as I know, his long-distance milk pipes were never put into practice.



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Harry Partch’s Zymo-Xyl

We’ve posted before about “hobo composer” Harry Partch. (Specifically, about his composition ‘Barstow’ inspired by hitchhiker graffiti he found on the outskirts of Barstow, CA).

Another of his oddities was his zymo xyl — a musical instrument he made out of 17 upside-down liquor bottles, 14 oak blocks, hubcaps from 1952 and ’52 Fords, and an aluminum kettle top. It was said to sound a bit like a xylophone. He specified that the liquor bottles should include two Old Heaven Hill bourbon bottles, two Gordon’s gin, and two Barclay’s whiskeys.

You can hear him play the zymo xyl at the end of the clip below.

Los Angeles Times – June 30, 1996

image source: wiktionary

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