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Mueller’s “Pit Bull” Andrew Weissmann Headlining Virtual Fundraiser For Joe Biden

Andrew Weissmann

Mueller’s “pit bull” Andrew Weissmann is headlining a virtual fundraiser for 2020 presumptive Democrat nominee Joe Biden on June 2nd.

Weissmann is a partisan political hack who previously admitted the special counsel’s team “tried to get rid of” President Trump by laying a perjury trap.

TRENDING: AIN’T GONNA HAPPEN: Alan Dershowitz Says Americans Can be Forced to Take Coronavirus Vaccine (VIDEO)

Many believe devil Weissmann was in charge of the entire special counsel operation and Robert Mueller was just the figurehead.

Weissmann is an anti-Trump activist who hired nearly 2 dozen angry Democrat lawyers to torment and hunt down Trump and his associates.

“President Trump should pardon most everyone caught up in the Mueller witchhunt,” Judicial Watch boss Tom Fitton said in reaction to Weissmann’s fundraising campaign.

Recall, Weissmann attended Hillary Clinton’s “funeral” (election night party) at the Javits Center in New York City and praised Sally Yates for refusing to uphold President Trump’s travel ban.



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Trump And Biden Wage An Uneven Virtual Campaign : NPR

A screen capture shows the introduction to a Trump campaign nightly webcast.

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A screen capture shows the introduction to a Trump campaign nightly webcast.

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If you’re a supporter of President Trump, longing for the excitement and MAGA-kinship of a big rally, Trump’s campaign has built the next best thing. It’s a massive digital operation that creates an interactive world where President Trump is flawless, Republicans are saviors, while Democrats and Joe Biden are wrong and dangerous.

They encourage supporters to “forget the mainstream media” and get their “facts straight from the source,” an insular information ecosystem featuring prime time programming, accessed in its most pure form through the new Trump 2020 app.

Campaign manager Brad Parscale recently likened the Trump digital operation to the Death Star from the Star Wars movies.

Well, Joe Biden’s campaign is now comparing itself to the rebel alliance, the rag-tag crew fighting the Empire with whatever it could piece together.

All of this matters so much more because the coronavirus pandemic has brought the traditional presidential campaigning to a standstill. Biden is stuck at home in Wilmington, Del., while Trump is deprived of his raucous rallies, so the battle for the presidency is now largely being waged over the Internet.

The Trump campaign has a slick intro to its nightly webcasts, with a version evoking action movie graphics in a virtual rally arena.


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It’s an arena where Biden is outmatched by his Republican opponent on a few levels. He doesn’t have the social media dominance that Trump does. He also doesn’t have Trump’s instincts to entertain and outrage.

Instead, the presumptive Democratic nominee is trying to counter with a brand built on empathy and experience. And Biden’s campaign is counting on the idea that it’s what people want in a crisis, even if four decades as a senator and vice president don’t necessarily prepare someone to create viral moments.

“The things that we’re obviously trying to do in a virtual space are create those opportunities for interaction,” said Biden digital director Rob Flaherty, “and sort of fill the void of leadership that we’re seeing in Washington right now where the VP is an empathetic and competent leader in a time where people are craving both empathy and competence.”

The Biden message is focused on the incredibly strong headwinds that President Trump faces in his reelection bid: a pandemic and a deep recession. The president’s campaign is counting on being able to overcome it all, at least in part with a digital behemoth that it’s been building and perfecting since 2015. Parscale’s elevation to campaign manager after being Trump’s digital director in 2016 sent an early signal of what would drive the 2020 campaign.

The Biden campaign, on the other hand, has a digital presence that’s admittedly still in development. They’re looking outward to put him in as many places as possible and in front of as many people as possible.

That means Biden’s team is organizing meetings over Zoom, conducting local TV interviews with anchors in battleground states, beaming the former vice president onto cable shows from his basement, and collaborating on Instagram with celebrities like soccer star Megan Rapinoe, who may have a bigger following than the candidate.

“We really try to think about what is the broadest, widest array of creative programming that we can do to get him in front of people who are not necessarily dialed into politics day in and day out, but are looking at this crisis and feeling an incredible sense of uncertainty about what they’re seeing from Trump,” said Kate Bedingfield, Biden’s communications director.

A prime-time president

Every night at 8 p.m. ET, you can tune into a Team Trump webcast on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and in the campaign’s app, starting with a slick intro that’s part campaign ad, part movie trailer, part cable news show open. Trump doesn’t appear live, but glowing descriptions of him are a constant.

The programs are hosted by campaign aides and members of the Trump family, with big name guests like Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who are teed up to amplify the Trump message.

“Why do Democrats insist on keeping people out of work, holding them hostage over ridiculous demands,” Lara Trump, the president’s daughter-in-law asked McConnell on a recent webcast.

Lara Trump, the president’s daughter-in-law and a campaign adviser, speaks to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., during a campaign webcast on May 11.

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Lara Trump, the president’s daughter-in-law and a campaign adviser, speaks to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., during a campaign webcast on May 11.

YouTube/Donald J Trump

It looks like cable news, but in reality it’s more like an elaborate infomercial. Graphics in the lower third of the screen rotate through discount codes to buy Trump merchandise and prompts to download the Trump 2020 app or text the campaign.

There are multiple commercial breaks during each program, which feature a mix of pro-Trump and anti-Biden campaign ads, information about how to volunteer, and more reminders to download the app.

“The Democrats and the fake news media hate my father more than they love our country and they are doing whatever it takes to tear us down at the expense of the American people,” Donald Trump Jr. says in one ad, speaking intensely. “That’s why we need every American patriot to step up and join our fight. Just download our app.”

A daytime Democrat

The Biden campaign doesn’t have anything akin to its own version of a flashy prime-time cable lineup. Instead, in a given week, they deliver a mix of virtual content: organizing meetings with former Democratic presidential candidates Beto O’Rourke and Pete Buttigieg, Zoom fundraisers with donors, and virtual roundtables with Democratic governors to discuss COVID-19.

On a recent Thursday afternoon, Biden joined Democratic Govs. Gretchen Whitmer of Michigan, Ned Lamont of Connecticut, and Phil Murphy of New Jersey to talk about their states’ responses to the virus and what the federal government ought to do to help.

Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks on May 14 with Democratic Govs. Gretchen Whitmer of Michigan, Phil Murphy of New Jersey and Ned Lamont of Connecticut about the response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks on May 14 with Democratic Govs. Gretchen Whitmer of Michigan, Phil Murphy of New Jersey and Ned Lamont of Connecticut about the response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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The events don’t have the snazzy production value you see when tuning into an evening of Trump campaign programming. Biden led the discussion from his patio at home in Wilmington, Del., with the sound of geese in the background.

These virtual events have some of the familiarity of a traditional Biden campaign event — intro music, periodic tangents (“those Canadian geese are trying to get away from the virus,” Biden jokes at one point) and the turns of phrase that have long been dubbed “Bidenisms.” For all those personal touches, they also lack the fundamental intimacy of in-person campaign events.

Still, both Biden and his campaign insist they’re able to reach millions of people this way, brushing off the criticism that the Biden basement show is somehow hurting their campaign. For them, it’s not just about how the message is delivered, it’s about the message itself, convinced that the November election will be a referendum on how President Trump has handled the coronavirus, and that gives them, they believe, an advantage.

And the critique of Trump’s response is delivered consistently.

“The federal government should be having your backs, and hasn’t done it enough,” Biden told the governors.

“He’s been incompetent, the way in which he’s responded to it,” Biden recently said on ABC’s Good Morning America, in yet another interview from his home studio.

Air Force One vs. local airwaves

Meanwhile, Trump has all the advantages of incumbency. His trademark rallies are gone for now, but with the White House testing everyone who could come near him for COVID-19, Trump can fly in Air Force One to swing states for official events that have all the contours of his rallies.

On a visit to a Pennsylvania manufacturer of protective equipment used by health care workers, the Trump campaign soundtrack played over the speakers and Trump’s speech featured the usual jeering at the press in the back, the insults and name calling.

President Trump arrives to speak after a tour of Owens & Minor Inc., a medical supply company in Allentown, Pa., on May 14. The president has made several official visits to key battleground states since the coronavirus pandemic has shut down his typical rallies.

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President Trump arrives to speak after a tour of Owens & Minor Inc., a medical supply company in Allentown, Pa., on May 14. The president has made several official visits to key battleground states since the coronavirus pandemic has shut down his typical rallies.

Evan Vucci/AP

Biden hasn’t traveled anywhere for the last couple of months. Instead, he and his wife Jill Biden have begun “virtual travel days,” where they host multiple events in one day in a key battleground state. On Wednesday, for example, Biden held a virtual roundtable “in” La Crosse, Wis., to discuss rural issues. Then, later in the day, he held a virtual rally in Milwaukee.

Throughout the primary season, voters often attended Biden rallies for the opportunity to shake the vice president’s hand and take a photo with him on the rope line after he had finished a speech. That experience is hard to replicate digitally.

One major challenge of not holding in-person events is that a candidate is forfeiting valuable local news coverage, something President Trump can pick up with his official travel.

“Most people don’t go to those rallies,” explained John Sides, a political science professor at Vanderbilt University. “But you’re trying to use those events as an opportunity to get some attention to your campaign and to be able to communicate to voters with messages and visuals that are scripted by you, as opposed to posed to you by a reporter.”

Local news is consistently considered one of the most trusted news sources across the political spectrum, and Biden’s campaign has put a high premium on interviews in battleground states. Last week, he did interviews with stations in Nevada, North Carolina and Arizona.

Arizona has traditionally voted Republican, but the Biden campaign recently said it intends to target Arizona, along with a couple of other traditionally solid GOP states: Georgia and Texas.

Former Vice President Joe Biden appears for an interview with a local television program in Phoenix, Ariz.


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Biden often beams into TV shows from his basement, flanked by books and family photos. His strategy is about emphasizing empathy and character, and doing that in a way that can maximize reach.

Still, the fact is Biden is still largely stuck in his house, and he’s often forced to explain that in these interviews.

“I’d much rather be out, but our governor has a shelter-in-place order here in the state. I’m obeying that order,” Biden told KLAS-TV in Las Vegas.

He insists that he’s listening to the scientists and that staying indoors while Trump is on the road hasn’t changed the race. He points to polling that shows he’s maintained a consistent lead over the president in recent weeks.

“Matter of fact, in a bizarre way, the president, the more he’s out there the more he hurts himself, I think,” Biden said in that same interview.

This is a view shared by many Democratic consultants, who say Trump’s constant presence hasn’t helped him in recent weeks.

“In a quest for content there is no way the Biden campaign is going to be able to produce as much as a reelection campaign and hyper politicized White House that turns official events into campaign stops,” said Jesse Ferguson, who worked on Hillary Clinton’s 2016 campaign. “The imbalance is real, for sure. But is it a problem? Not necessarily. One of the most pervasive emotions people feel about Trump is exhausted.”

Organizing battleground neighbors

Even though Biden is not yet traveling to battleground states to campaign, his campaign is still trying to organize supporters in those key states. The campaign says it’s trained thousands of volunteers over Zoom meetings in the last few weeks.

On a recent Zoom call, Gabriella Cascone, the Biden campaign’s national training director, walked some 700 volunteers in Pennsylvania through the process of making community check-in calls. The campaign’s current phone banking strategy is not about attacking Trump or getting out the vote, it’s about being a comforting neighbor in a moment of crisis.

“Really, these are meant to be a way to let folks know that we care about them and we’re thinking about them in this time,” Cascone told volunteers over the call. “It’s important that we follow the vice president’s lead in demonstrating this deep empathy and concern toward our supporters.”

That was the approach taken by the Trump campaign and Republican National Committee a month and a half ago. But wellness checks have been replaced with scorched-earth scripts meant to cause maximum harm to Biden’s image.

Last Tuesday, Joe Vazzano, a Republican regional field director in Southwestern Pennsylvania, used Zoom to walk about 100 Trump campaign volunteers in his area through the process of making calls to voters.

It was a “national week of action,” which meant there was an extra push to train volunteers and get them working the phones. The aim is to beat up Biden, tie him to China and paint him as an establishment figure with conflicts of interest because of his son Hunter’s business activity.

The scripts the volunteers were given to read when calling voters included lines like, “Beijing Biden promoted trade deals that killed American jobs and shipped them overseas to China” and “Beijing Biden’s relationship with China benefited his family. His son, Hunter was involved in a business deal with a Chinese investment fund.” This dovetailed with ads the Trump campaign was running on television stations in the same swing states the volunteers were calling.

Over the course of the week, the Republican Party, which is fully integrated with the Trump campaign, held about 500 training sessions like that one. Volunteers and staff organizers made 10 million calls, a new record according to the RNC. The Biden campaign did not provide metrics for an equivalent time frame.

Social media reach

According to the Facebook Ad Library, the Trump campaign spent more than twice as much last week on Facebook ads as the Biden campaign, and it included a three-day test of a dizzying array of hits on Biden. Some portrayed him as old and unfit, others as a puppet of China.

“One of the greatest strengths President Trump has is taking someone’s perceived greatest strength and turning it into a weakness,” said Jason Miller who was senior communications adviser on the 2016 campaign. He says in the face of the coronavirus, the Trump campaign is “controlling the variable it can control for — going negative on Biden.”

Teddy Goff, a Democratic strategist who ran Barack Obama’s 2012 digital operation, concedes Trump is incredibly talented at capturing attention, but he’s skeptical that the president’s virtual programming is actually reaching the right kinds of people for a general election.

“Donald Trump can send a berzerk tweet that kind of ping pongs around the right-wing Twitter-sphere and gets 50,000 retweets, and it probably doesn’t persuade a single voter,” he said. “And it might actually turn off a couple of voters.”

The Trump campaign isn’t really doing persuasion. It’s firing up the base, finding supporters who didn’t vote last time and getting them to vote this time.

“This is about protecting your voters from anything that might, maybe not persuade them to vote for someone else, but might keep them from turning out,” said Stefan Smith, who was the online engagement director for Pete Buttigieg’s presidential campaign and has spent a lot of time looking at the Trump app and the Team Trump video offerings.”Keep them angry and you keep them engaged,” he added.

On his own Facebook page, Trump has over 29 million followers. Less than 2 million follow Joe Biden. Twitter tells a similar story: 80 million for Trump, 5.4 million for Biden.

The Biden campaign barely made any digital hires for months, but Flaherty says they have plans to double their staff soon, though he wouldn’t provide any specific staffing numbers.

Since the Biden campaign went mostly virtual in late March, it’s had over 125 million views of its videos and online content, while Trump’s campaign has had nearly three times as many views since April 1, according to numbers provided by the campaigns.

The Biden team argues that, since their candidate has millions fewer followers, in some ways he’s actually punching above his weight.



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Is There a Joe Biden Translator App Yet? Biden Stumbles Through Another Virtual Event (VIDEO)

 

Is there a Joe Biden translator app, yet?

Biden on Wednesday stumbled his way through a virtual event about rural issues with Democrat Congressman Ron Kind and other guests.

77-year-old Biden is still hiding in his basement but his gaffes and bloopers are piling up.

“And we’re going to create a new bio-based multi-facturing – multi-manufacturing job pro..uh uh…environment to deal farmers in on the benefits of a changing economy,” said Biden.

TRENDING: AIN’T GONNA HAPPEN: Alan Dershowitz Says Americans Can be Forced to Take Coronavirus Vaccine (VIDEO)

WATCH:

At least Biden’s handlers were smart enough to finally move him away from the honking geese.

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Facebook Launches Virtual Shopping Mall, Saying It Will Help Small Businesses : NPR

Facebook hopes to make commerce a bigger part of its operation by letting businesses set up storefronts in its apps.

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Facebook hopes to make commerce a bigger part of its operation by letting businesses set up storefronts in its apps.

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Facebook is making a big push into online shopping by letting businesses set up free storefronts on its social network and Instagram.

Businesses can feature items in their shops, advertise them to users, and communicate with customers through the company’s messaging services. Shops will eventually be integrated across Facebook’s apps, including WhatsApp and Messenger.

Shoppers can buy products either through links to the businesses’ own websites or by using Instagram’s checkout feature, which enables purchasing within the app. Checkout will become available on Facebook in the future.

The company has been looking to make commerce a bigger part of its business in a bid to capture users’ time and new sources of revenue. CEO Mark Zuckerberg said those efforts have ramped up because of the coronavirus pandemic, which has left many of the 160 million small businesses that use Facebook’s apps struggling.

“We’re seeing a lot of small businesses that never had online presences get online for the first time, and we’re seeing small businesses that had online presences now make them their primary way of doing business,” he said in a livestreamed announcement Tuesday. “For lots of small businesses during this period, this is the difference between staying afloat and going under.”

Facebook will not charge businesses to create virtual storefronts, Zuckerberg said.

“We know that if [Facebook] Shops are valuable for businesses they’re going to in general want to bid more for ads. We’ll eventually make money that way,” he said, noting that small businesses make up “the vast majority” of Facebook advertisers.

Facebook first launched the checkout feature last year on Instagram in the U.S., letting people stay in the app to complete their purchases. Instagram takes a cut of each sale.

Editor’s note: Facebook is among NPR’s financial supporters.

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Obama Takes Veiled Swipe at Trump in Black Colleges Virtual Graduation Address

Former President Barack Obama took a veiled swipe at President Trump during a virtual commencement address for HBCU (historically black colleges and universities) on Saturday.

““More than anything, this pandemic has fully, finally torn back the curtain on the idea that so many of the folks in charge know what they’re doing. A lot of them aren’t even pretending to be in charge,”

Video clip of Obama’s remarks:

TRENDING: “We’ll Just Get Rid of All Whites in the United States” – CDC Chair of Advisory Committee on Immunizations Lashes Out at White Americans (VIDEO)

In case there is any doubt whom Obama was criticizing, Rolling Stone spelled it out, “Obama torches Trump on COVID-19: “A lot of them aren’t even pretending to be in charge”



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In Virtual Speech To Black Graduates, Obama Says U.S. Lacks Leadership On Coronavirus : NPR

Former President Barack Obama talks during a panel with NBA players Chris Paul, Kevin Love and Giannis Antetokounmpo and sports analyst Michael Wilbon in Chicago on Saturday, Feb. 15, 2020. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

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Former President Barack Obama talks during a panel with NBA players Chris Paul, Kevin Love and Giannis Antetokounmpo and sports analyst Michael Wilbon in Chicago on Saturday, Feb. 15, 2020. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

Nam Y. Huh/AP

Former President Barack Obama delivered a virtual commencement address on Saturday, urging the tens of thousands of graduates from historically black colleges and universities to “seize the initiative” amid what he described as a lack of leadership from leaders in the United States to the coronavirus pandemic.

“More than anything, this pandemic has fully, finally torn back the curtain on the idea that so many of the folks in charge know what they’re doing,” Obama said in remarks that were streamed online. “A lot of them aren’t even pretending to be in charge. If the world’s gonna be better, it’s going to be up to you.”

Obama’s remarks come as the virus has killed more than 88,000 Americans and crippled the nation’s economy. He delivered them as part of “Show Me Your Walk HBCU Edition,” a virtual commencement hosted Saturday by the comedian Kevin Hart. The event included a stream of prominent black athletes, politicians and entertainers — many of whom attended HBCUs themselves.

While Obama’s remarks were billed as a sendoff for graduating seniors — forced by the pandemic to leave campuses across the country and unable to participate in more traditional commencement ceremonies — Obama also appeared to bring the graduates together around a set of shared values.

The former president made note of the disproportionate impact that the pandemic has had on black communities. Black Americans account for a disproportionate number of coronavirus-related deaths in the U.S. There have also been stark racial disparities in the economic impact of the outbreak.

Addressing these disparities, Obama said that coronavirus “spotlights the underlying inequalities and extra burdens that black communities have historically had to deal with in this country.”

He also made reference to the killing of Ahmaud Arbery, the 25-year-old black man who was fatally shot in Georgia in February, saying there were disparities evident not just in public health, but “just as we see it when a black man goes for a jog, and some folks feel like they can stop and question and shoot him if he doesn’t submit to their questioning.”

Obama praised the key role that historically black colleges play in the black community, telling graduates that now more than ever, they have the tools they need to seize their power to make change. Obama called on the 2020 class to be “bold” and have a “vision that isn’t clouded by cynicism or fear.”

Taylor Harris, 22, who attended Hampton University, said she was glad to see Obama and others taking notice of HBCUs given their key role in educating a large population of low income and first-generation students.

“I feel like we don’t get a lot of recognition — they kind of looked at as second tier compared to Ivy League schools or predominately white institutions,” said Harris. “So I’m just glad that celebrities are taking the chance to embrace our young African-American graduates. There are so many statistics that we have overcome, just graduating for college.”

Harris left Hampton’s campus nine weeks ago, and went home to St. Louis, assuming she’d be back on campus in a matter of weeks.

“At first people were excited, it was like a little break,” Harris said. “But as soon as I got back home and I knew that I couldn’t return back to campus, now I’m living out of a suitcase.”

Hampton University is planning on holding a commencement ceremony for graduating seniors in September. Harris said that’s a long way in the future, but she hopes she gets the opportunity to walk across the stage in front of her family and friends, and professors that she said became like family too.

Obama’s remarks on Saturday marked the first of three speeches he is scheduled to deliver to graduating students. On Saturday evening, the former president is slated to take part in a prime time special for high school graduates that will air on the major television networks. In June, Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama are also scheduled to speak at a commencement hosted by YouTube.

Over the course of his presidency, Obama gave in-person commencement addresses at three historically black colleges: Hampton University, Howard University and Morehouse College.

On Saturday, he said that graduates of such institutions are “inheritors of one of America’s proudest traditions” and that “no generation has been better positioned to be warriors for justice and remake the world.”

Donethe Cyprien, 22, graduated from Morgan State University in Baltimore on Saturday. Since Morgan State ended in-person classes, she’s been with family in Montgomery County, Maryland.

“Honestly, it was sad,” she said after participating in her virtual commencement. “Right now I’m supposed to be at school actually doing all of this. Instead, I’m watching my graduation in my bed and texting my friends.”

Cyprien said virtual commencements are a nice gesture, but can’t replicate what she and other members of the class of 2020 have lost.

“All those goodbyes, those hugs — all that was supposed to be happening in person.”

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Biden’s Latest Virtual Event Was a Gretchen Whitmer Praisefest

Four Democrats were present at former Vice President Joe Biden’s latest virtual event, a roundtable to discuss states’ responses to COVID-19. But among the trio of male voices, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer took center stage. 

“I think you’ve done one hell of a job,” Biden said to Whitmer from his home porch in Wilmington, Delaware on Thursday afternoon, teeing up a lengthy conversation filled with overt praise of the woman who is thought to be in the mix as his potential running mate.

“Gretchen’s got it exactly right,” Gov. Ned Lamont (D-CT) said a few minutes later to a response from Whitmer about her approach in Michigan.  “Gretchen said it,” Gov. Phil Murphy (D-NJ) added at another point. 

Throughout the round table, Biden, Murphy, and Lamont continued to elevate Whitmerone of a dozen names thought to be considered by Biden’s newly announced vice presidential vetting committeewho has been overseeing the state-wide response to the novel coronavirus pandemic. 

On the virtual campaign trail, Biden is routinely asked about the most important traits in selecting a running mate. He often responds with a “simpatico” relationship and preparedness to lead as top traits.

“The first and most important attribute is, if something happens to me, the moment after it does, that that person is capable of taking over as President of the United States of America,” Biden said during a virtual fundraiser on Wednesday night, according to a pool report of the event.  “I want to make sure that the person I pick is bright, has capacities in areas that I do not, that I’m not as qualified, that I don’t have as much capacity. And in fact, is ready to be president on day one. And that process is underway, and I can’t tell you that it’s been narrowed down at all, we’re just beginning.”

During Thursday afternoon’s panel, Whitmer provided the most detailed answers to Biden’s questions about efforts being done on the front lines to mitigate the spread of the virus, acknowledging that the state’s “aggressive actions are starting to pay off,” but cautioning that “we’ve still got a lot of work to do,” and that “there’s no question that we need help from the federal government.”

At one point, when asked by Biden about the likelihood that the pandemic could rebound in the falla scenario that health experts have cautioned the public about for several weeksWhitmer was not shy about jumping in first. 

“Maybe I’ll start if that’s all right,” she said. “What we know is that until there’s a vaccine or a cure, the best tool that we have, aside from social distancing, is testing. We have the capabilities to keep up testing. But what we don’t have are some of the critical simple supplies.”

Biden, who pledged to select a woman as his running mate in mid-March, largely steered clear of a political conversation, opting instead for questions about specific needs on the ground. Towards the end of the conversation, however, when addressing the former vice president’s request for the governors’ final thoughts, Murphy and Lamont veered into politics, saying  the country needs Biden to defeat President Donald Trump in the White House.

Whitmer, notably, did not.  

Instead, she turned the panel’s attention back to the bigger picture in the fight against coronavirus.  

“I hope we’ve learned a lot about racial disparities,” she said. “I hope that we have learned to embrace science.”

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Biden Can’t Remember Who Briefs Him Every Morning in Virtual Town Hall Marred by Glitches, Audio Problems (VIDEO)

What is wrong with old Joe?

77-year-old Biden held a virtual round table to discuss the Coronavirus from his basement on Thursday.

As usual, his virtual town hall was marred by glitches and audio problems.

Biden also struggled to remember who briefs him every morning.

TRENDING: John Brennan Goes Berserk After His Role in Unmasking General Mike Flynn Revealed

He’s not playing with a full deck.

“Um, and uh, and I’m not, and I, I have a, I have a uh, like all of you but every day I get between an hour and an hour and a half brief with um, uh, the former head of, our former surgeon general, anyway, with docs across the country,” said Biden.

Got that?

WATCH:



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DNC Asks Donors To Pay Up To $100,000 For A ‘Virtual Dinner’ With Hillary Clinton

How much would you pay to have dinner with Hillary Clinton on the internet?

The DNC is hoping their donors will pay up to $100,000 dollars for the chance. That’s a lot of cash for a ‘virtual’ event.

Could they possibly get any takers for this?

The Blaze reports:

TRENDING: Texas Governor And Attorney General Call For Immediate Release Of Jailed Salon Owner, Rip Judge For ‘Political Stunt’

DNC is asking people to pay upward of $100K for a ‘virtual dinner’ with Hillary Clinton

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is set to appear at a “virtual dinner” campaign event for presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden later this month that could cost attendees up to $100,000.

The event, put on by the Biden for President Victory Fund and the Democratic National Committee, will be hosted on Zoom and is scheduled for May 19, Politico reported Tuesday.

A PDF of the flyer shows that the event will be extremely pricey to attend. “Hosts” are expected to pay $100,000 to attend the virtual dinner, while other tickets are available for $50,000, $41,100, $15,600, $5,600, and $2,800 at “limited availability.”

As a bonus, attendees will be joined by DNC Chair Tom Perez for the one-hour dinner.

Clinton endorsed the former vice president last week during a virtual town hall after largely staying out of the political spotlight during the Democratic primary.

Will they be serving virtual food?

And Democrats think they’re the party of the little guy?

Cross posted from American Lookout.



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